The Complete List of All Guinea Pig Breeds!

The Ultimate List of Guinea Pig Breeds

Guinea pigs make the perfect pet for families. Although the are not recognized as much as other pets, they are timid and loveable creatures to have around. Matter of fact, if you're looking to adopt there are many guinea pig breeds to consider. The American Cavy Breeders Association recognizes 13 different breeds, however there are several other breeds known to exist. Below we mention all the guinea pig breeds that exist to date from are most popular known breeds to rarer breeds.

The Complete List of All Guinea Pig Breeds

Every breed has a special characteristic about them, that makes you want to adopt every kind of guinea pig you see. Although every guinea pig is different, we love them the same. Always remember to adopt guinea pigs in pairs and to care for them by supplying lots of healthy hay and clean GuineaDad Liners. Now, let's go over each one of them!

Breeds Recognized by the American Cavy Breeders Association

Abyssinian Guinea Pig

This breed of guinea pig is known for the numerous cowlicks, formally called rosettes, that cover their bodies. Ideally, an Abyssinian will have six to eight open standing rosettes that are evenly spaced across their body. They are also known to be one of the more vocal, friendly, and energetic guinea pig breeds.

Abyssinian Guinea Pig

Abyssinian guinea pig breed

Abyssinian Satin Guinea Pig

Abyssinian Satins are very similar to Abyssinian guinea pigs, with the largest difference being the satin sheen of their shiny fur. This can make the colors and patterns of their rosettes appear even more striking. Their glossy fur is what gives them their name, however, the breeding of this variety brings a gene that makes these type of guinea pigs prone to many health problems and shorter life span. This might be a breed you come across if you are around guinea pig rescues. 

Abyssinian Satin Guinea Pig

abyssinian fun fact

American Guinea Pig

This type of guinea pig is the most commonly-owned, likely thanks to their sweet and docile personalities. Their short and smooth coats can come in 19 different color classifications and should have no cowlicks or rosettes. They have a matte appearance and generally need less grooming than other types of guinea pigs. American Guinea Pigs are a great breed to choose when it comes to first time pet owners. 

American Guinea Pig

American Satin Guinea Pig

Just like the Satin version of most breeds, the American Satin is nearly identical to the American guinea pigs. The most obvious difference in their appearance is that their smooth, short coat, void of rosettes is also shiny. Just like Abyssinian Satin Guinea Pigs, they are prone to many health concerns and deformities. This breed is great for people who are ready and are patient with caring for special needs piggies.

American Satin Guinea Pig

Coronet Guinea Pig

Most easily identified by their voluminous, flowing mane, Coronet guinea pigs have quite the appearance. Their long fur grows mostly backward except for one single rosette on the top of their head, hence their name. Thankfully, this breed loves playing and receiving attention, because their coat needs to be regularly brushed and maintained.

Coronet Guinea Pig

Peruvian Guinea Pig

The Peruvian guinea pig’s are another breed with longer hair. Their coat is certainly impressive if not enviable. Their smooth, straight fur grows from back to front along a center part and can grow up to two feet long! Despite two rosettes, one over the hindquarters and one on the head, their mature coat usually covers their face and requires frequent grooming and trimming.

Peruvian Guinea Pig

Peruvian guinea pig

Peruvian Satin Guinea Pig

The coat of a Peruvian Satin guinea pig is equally impressive as the standard Peruvian breed. Added to its long beautiful coat is a satin sheen, evident through the middle part along the back down the length of the fur. Unfortunately, like all satin breeds, they come with many health concerns and need patient and loving care.

Peruvian Satin Guinea Pig

Silkie Guinea Pig

Silkie guinea pigs, sometimes also known as Shelties, have a soft, luxurious curtain of fur. Their fur is naturally parted down the middle of their back and guided away from their face, unlike Peruvian guinea pigs. Their fur is slightly longer along their hindquarters. Silkies have no parts or rosettes in their fur, and should ideally, have a teardrop body confirmation when viewed from above.

Silkie Guinea Pig

Silkie Satin Guinea Pig

Just like the standard Sheltie, Silkie Satins may also go by the name of Sheltie Satin. Their coat grows from front to back with no center part, and thanks to no rosettes, their hair is quite straight and smooth. This breed is like other satin breeds in which they exhibit health issues, including bone and dental complications.

Silkie Satin Guinea Pig

Teddy Guinea Pig

Unlike other guinea pig breeds with smooth, sleek fur, Teddy guinea pigs have a short, dense coat that stands up out from their body. Their plush coat is resilient to the touch, and greatly resembles a teddy bear, hence their name. This fun, fluffy appearance suits their loving and playful nature and allows for only periodic grooming and maintenance.

Teddy Guinea Pig

Teddy Satin Guinea Pig

Teddy Satin guinea pigs, similarly, have a short, plush coat which gives them a bear-like appearance. Their dense fur, which stands away from their body, has a bright, satin sheen. This type of guinea pig breed needs patience and love, as they may come with many health concerns.

Teddy Satin Guinea Pig

Texel Guinea Pig

With a coat type more unusual than other types, Texel guinea pigs have a medium-length, fluffy, curly coat. Texel guinea pigs are a cross breed between a Silkie and Rex guinea pig. Their dense fur is prone to tangles and matting so they require coat maintenance pretty much every day. Their fur should be curly all over, including their stomach, and is typically parted along the middle of their back.

Texel Guinea Pig

Texel guinea pig breed

White Crested Guinea Pig

This short-haired breed can come in a variety of colors and is most recognizable by its single white whorl or rosette on its forehead. They are considered to be very closely related to their cousin, American guinea pig breed, as they short coats. White Crested guinea pigs should have short, smooth fur, and in show cavies, the rest of the coat's color must be a different solid other than white.

White Crested Guinea Pig

Hairless Guinea Pig Breeds

Baldwin Guinea Pig

This breed guinea pig is completely hairless, thanks to a genetic mutation in a white-crested golden agouti. They are the largest of the hairless guinea pigs and often live longer as well. Since so much of their skin is exposed, special care should be provided to keep them clean, reduce irritations, and avoid wounds. Always be sure to keep easy to clean guinea pig bedding, like GuineaDad Liners, so they can live in a warm and clean environment.

Baldwin Guinea Pig

Skinny Guinea Pig

Although Skinny Guinea Pigs are also classified as hairless, they tend to have hair on their muzzles, legs, feet, and sometimes along their back. They tend to be smaller and live shorter lives compared to other hairless guinea pigs. Being hairless means that they require special consideration such as specialized skincare, avoiding direct sunlight, and having access to a warm and soft GuineaDad Liner at all times.

Skinny Guinea Pig

Popular Guinea pig breeds

Miscellaneous Guinea Pig Breeds

Alpaca Guinea Pig

Often considered one of the most beautiful breeds, Alpaca guinea pigs have dense, curly fur. Although it isn’t super long, their coat is prone to tangling, so it will need to be brushed regularly. Because of its coarse nature, their fur should feel plush, and springy to the touch when properly groomed. The Alpaca breed can live up to eight years!

Alpaca Guinea Pig

Lunkarya Guinea Pig

This breed actually carries three variations: Lunkarya Peruvian, Lunkarya Sheltie, and Lunkarya Coronet. They all boast a long, curly coat that cascades in all directions, giving them a mop-like appearance. Because their fur is so thick, “Lunks” don’t do well in heat, and require daily grooming.

Lunkarya Guinea Pig

Rex Guinea Pig

Rather than a typical guinea pig appearance, Rex guinea pigs look more like a chinchilla. Their fur is short and similar in texture to wool, making it much more manageable than breeds with long fur. Additionally, their large droopy ears and desire to be handled make them stand out even more.

Rex Guinea Pig

rex guinea pig breed

Sheba Guinea Pig

While lots of guinea pig breeds have unique fur, Sheba guinea pigs have long mutton chops which frame their face. The odd way their fur sticks out without a true part gives them the nickname “Bad Hair Day” guinea pig. Although they will need regular maintenance to care for their coat, it grows slower than other long-haired breeds.

Sheba Guinea Pig

Sheba guinea pig breed


8 comments


  • Madison Madden

    You didn’t mention Himalayan Guinea Pigs. My girl Haribo is a mix between a Himalayan and Sheltie.


  • Wendy Jordan

    My first ever pig was a Rex and he was the cuddliest and most affectionate little pigs I’ve ever known. He was special to me and I miss him greatly. He loved being picked up and would literally jump on to my lap during floor time.


  • mary

    You should definitely sell some stuff with that cute artwork!! Great post


  • Cheyanne

    This article is so helpful but the illustrations are my fav! They’re so cute! I have an american and an abyssinian and would love to purchase art work to hang by their cage. I really recommend selling some :)


  • Siobhan

    Hi, I absolutely love this article. Like previous comments have said, it would be great to buy these artworks. Also, I own 2 silver crested agouti guinea pigs, and though they are not a particularly popular breed of piggy, I can’t help but wonder why on Earth agouti guinea pigs are not on the list.
    Thanks so much!


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